A Message from the Provost

Gregory Maggs to serve as interim dean of the George Washington University Law School.
December 03, 2012

President Steven Knapp and I are pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Gregory Maggs as interim dean of the George Washington University Law School. Professor Maggs will assume this role on Jan. 16, 2013, when Dean Paul Berman moves to his new position as vice provost for online education and academic innovation. Professor Maggs will serve in this interim role while the university and the Law School prepare for and subsequently conduct a search for the next dean.

Professor Maggs brings extensive experience to this role, including a prior term as interim dean. He has served the Law School since 1993 as a faculty member, senior associate dean for academic affairs, and co-director of the National Security and U.S. Foreign Relations Law Program. He received the George Washington Award for outstanding contributions to the university in 2012, and the Law School’s Distinguished Faculty Service Award (conferred by vote of the graduating class) in 1997, 1998, 2004, 2005, 2011 and 2012.

Professor Maggs’s past experience includes service as a law clerk for Justices Clarence Thomas and Anthony M. Kennedy of the U.S. Supreme Court and for the late Judge Joseph T. Sneed of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, as a special master for the U.S. Supreme Court, and as an attorney in other legal positions. He has been an officer in the U.S. Army Reserve since 1990 and is currently assigned as a reserve military judge. Professor Maggs also previously was an assistant professor at the University of Texas School of Law.

I am also pleased to report that Professor Maggs has asked Professor Christopher Bracey to continue to serve as senior associate dean and he has agreed to do so. Please join me in thanking both colleagues for their dedicated service to the university.

Sincerely,
Steven Lerman
Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs
The George Washington University

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