GW Today’s Fall Guide to the Arts

Bob Woodward, Mystery Science Theater 3000, the Death Becomes Us True Crime Festival and more artistic and cultural options on campus and off.

image of the Fall Dance Concert
The Fall Dance Concert showcases student choreography. (Harrison Jones/GW Today)
September 12, 2018

September

Opening Sept. 12 Dawoud Bey: The Birmingham Project
National Gallery of Art
4th St. and Constitution Ave., NW
Free

Coinciding with the 55th anniversary of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Ala., this exhibition visualizes the past through the lens of the present, pushing the boundaries of portraiture and engaging ongoing national issues of racism, violence against African Americans, and terrorism in churches. Each of Mr. Bey’s diptychs combines one portrait of a young person the same age as one of the victims with another of an adult 50 years older—the child’s age had they survived.

Sept. 14 at 7 p.m. Politics and Prose and GW Present José Andrés: “We Fed an Island”
Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
$15 to $35

Just after Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico, José Andrés arrived and started cooking. Mr. Andrés, whose 29 restaurants have earned him Michelin stars and James Beard Awards, fed hundreds of thousands of people as they scrambled to rebuild their lives. “We Fed an Island” describes his experiences in Puerto Rico and details the community of activists feeding the island to this day. A portion of the proceeds from book sales will be donated to the Chef Relief Network of World Central Kitchen for efforts in Puerto Rico and beyond.

Sept. 15 at 10 a.m. Celebration of Textiles: Turkey
The George Washington Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Explore Turkish art and culture at this free festival for all ages, where visitors can try weaving with local artists, enjoy Turkish dance performances, sample Turkish coffee and explore the spectacular craft of nomadic women from the museum’s latest exhibition, “A Nomad’s Art: Kilims of Anatolia.”

Sept. 17 at 6 p.m. Artist Talk and Performance: Cristal Chanelle Truscott
Flagg Building, Atrium Galleries
500 17th St., NW
Free, registration requested

Cristal Chanelle Truscott, the 2018-19 William Wilson Corcoran Visiting Professor of Community Engagement, is a playwright, scholar, educator and founder of Progress Theatre. This interactive artist talk and performance will focus on using theater as social movement and community activism and will feature live a cappella music and theatrical excerpts.

Sept. 20 at noon Workshop: Tiny Tapestries
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Complete your own tiny tapestry inspired by the stunning woven textiles on view in “A Nomad's Art: Kilims of Anatolia.”

Sept. 20 at 5:30 p.m. Film: “Daughters of Anatolia”
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

This film follows the Gök family, a group of nomadic goat herders, as they travel their seasonal migration from temperate winters along the Mediterranean Sea to cool summers in the Taurus Mountains.

Sept. 22 at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. International Arts Foundation presents Africa Umoja Spirit of Unity Tour 2018
Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
Tickets start at $30

This explosive celebration of South African culture features the music of Hugh Masekela, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Miriam Makeba and other legendary South African musicians.

Sept. 23 at 1 p.m. Truth Be Told: For Freedoms Panel Discussion
Flagg Building, Hammer Auditorium
500 17th St., NW
Free

Artists Nora Ligorano and Marshall Reese bring their public art series, “Melted Away,” to the National Mall on Sept. 22 with “TRUTH BE TOLD,” a slowly melting ice sculpture spelling the word TRUTH. They will join journalist Chip Gibbon and PEN America Washington Director Thomas O. Melia for a discussion of truth, art and public discourse.

Sept. 23 at 2 p.m. DC Beauty of Beijing Opera performance
Jack Morton Auditorium
805 21st St., NW
$25

The dramatic art of Beijing Opera is one of China’s most celebrated cultural traditions. Before performing six featured scenes from classic operas, DCBBO will give a brief overview of the art. The artists will then showcase the four major performance skills, which are singing, recitation, dance acting and martial arts.

Sept. 24 at noon Book Talk: DC Jazz: Stories of Jazz Music in Washington, D.C.
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Noted historians Maurice Jackson and Blair Ruble present a collection of original and fascinating stories about the D.C. jazz scene through history.

Sept. 27 at 7 p.m. GW & Politics and Prose present Bob Woodward: Fear
Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
$10 to $35

Bob Woodward, one of America's most notable investigative journalists, will discuss his latest book, “Fear: Trump in the White House.” Don’t miss this inside look at the Trump presidency. Tickets will go on sale Friday, Sept. 14, at noon. GW community members can claim their $10 tickets in person at Lisner at that time, while general tickets will be available online at gwutickets.com.

Sept. 29 at 9 a.m. Conference: Unveiling Fashion: Conversations About Fashion and Sustainability
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
$10 to $50

This conference examines the negative impact of the fashion industry on people and the planet and looks at ways individuals can implement sustainable changes in their own lives and neighborhoods. Presented by the DC Sustainable Fashion Collective.

Sept. 29 at 5 p.m. Opera in the Outfield
Nationals Park
1500 S Capitol St., SE
Free

This collaboration with the Washington National Opera is a perennial favorite, this year featuring “The Barber of Seville.” The ballpark opens at 5 p.m., while the simulcast begins at 7 p.m.

Sept. 29 at 7 p.m. Art All Night 
Various locations
Free

The city's overnight arts festival is a creative extravaganza taking place across eight neighborhoods and encompassing both visual and performance arts: painting, photography, sculpture, crafts, fashion, music, dance, theater, film, poetry and more.

image: 'liquid' by faig ahmed

The work of Faig Ahmed, coming to the George Washington Museum and The Textile Museum in October, challenges traditional ideas about material and shape. (Image courtesy Faig Ahmed studio)

October

Oct. 3 at 6 p.m. “Spiked”: A Conversation with Rob Rogers and Other Editorial Cartoonists
Flagg Building, Hammer Auditorium
500 17th St., NW
Free

Before “Spiked: The Unpublished Political Cartoons of Rob Rogers” moves from the Corcoran to the University of Pittsburgh, this panel talk will take on censorship, freedom of the press, journalistic integrity and the consequences of nationalism to a democracy.

Oct. 5, 12, 19 and 26 at noon Decorative Arts & Design History (DADH) Design + Discourse Lecture Series
Flagg Building, Salon Doré
500 17th St., NW
Free

The Design + Discourse series brings together emerging, independent and established scholars as part of an open, interdisciplinary intellectual platform for the decorative arts and design community.

Opening Oct. 6 Faig Ahmed: Nonvisual Language
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Acclaimed Azerbaijani artist Faig Ahmed creates breathtaking woven carpets that throw conventional patterns into chaos. This intimate exhibition introduces new works and installations by Mr. Ahmed, inspired by Peruvian textiles in the museum’s collections and his field research in the Peruvian Amazon.

Oct. 6 at 2:30 p.m. Film: “The Gospel According to André”
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Former American Vogue editor-at-large André Leon Talley has been a fashion world fixture for decades. This documentary follows his growth from a child in the segregated Jim Crow South to one of the most influential tastemakers and fashion curators of our times.

Oct. 12 at 7 p.m. and 10 p.m. Mystery Science Theater 3000 Live!
Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
Tickets start at $39.50

The Mystery Science Theater 3000 Live 30th Anniversary Tour features two separate, unique shows at Lisner, each featuring the wisecracking hosts and iconic robots from the cult favorite TV show riffing on a cheesy B-movie.

Oct. 13 at 10 a.m. Harshita Designs Trunk Show
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Browse a collection of wearable art for women and men, including scarves, shawls, tunics and pocket squares.

Closing Oct. 14 Tino Seghal: This You
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Independence Ave. and 7th St., SW
Free

The first exclusively live work ever acquired for the Hirshhorn’s permanent collection, “This You” features a solo female singer interacting with spectators. Mr. Sehgal says his artwork raises the question, “Can something that is not an inanimate object be considered valuable?”

Opening Oct. 17 Eye of the Bird: Visions and Views of D.C.’s Past
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

This exhibition examines the evolution of Washington, D.C., through two newly commissioned panoramic landscape paintings by local artist Peter Waddell. One shows the grand city that planner Pierre L’Enfant envisioned, while the other captures the city’s development by 1825, the year L’Enfant died.

Oct.18, 19, 20 at 7:30 p.m. and Oct. 21at 2 p.m. Proof
Dorothy Betts Marvin Theatre
800 21st St., NW
$10 to $20

How do you prove what is yours when everything around you is unstable, including yourself? Catherine is turning 25 and has spent years caring for her brilliant but unstable father. After his death, her estranged sister and a former student of her father both arrive, each with a different goal. “Proof” was the winner of the 2001 Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award for Best Play.

Opening Oct. 19 Ruby Slippers and American Culture Displays
The National Museum of American History
Constitution Ave. between 12th and 14th streets, NW

Dorothy’s ruby slippers from “The Wizard of Oz” return to view as one of eight installations displaying American history through culture, entertainment and the arts. Other artifacts on view include a New York Yankee Stadium ticket booth, jazz and classical instruments, a video game wall and a stained glass window from the Victor Company’s headquarters in Camden, N.J., featuring “Nipper,” the iconic dog listening to his master’s recorded voice.

Oct. 24 GW and Politics & Prose Present Pete Souza: Shade
Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
$10

After Pete Souza finished his eight-year run as Barack Obama’s White House photographer, he posted a string of Instagram posts pairing his vivid photography with incisive captions contrasting Obama to his successor. “Shade: A Tale of Two Presidents” includes hundreds of his Obama photographs as a powerful historical reminder of American values. The event is sold out to the general public, but GW community members can claim discounted tickets in person at the Lisner Auditorium box office using a GW ID.

Oct. 24 to 27 Smithsonian African American Film Festival
National Museum of African American History and Culture
1400 Constitution Ave., NW
$10 to $300

This inaugural celebration of African-American cinematic culture features both historic films and contemporary works by Barry Jenkins, Julie Dash, Bradford Young and more.

Oct. 29 at noon Lecture: “Hamilton: An American Musical” Unofficial Location Guide
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Scholar and author Bryan Barreras explains how locations from Hamilton’s life are connected to songs in the musical, providing historical context for each location.

death becomes us logo image

"Death Becomes Us: A True Crime Festival" comes to Lisner in November.

November

Opening Nov. 1 Rafael Lozano-Hammer: Pulse
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
Independence Ave. and 7th St., SW
Free

These three major installations use heart rate sensors to create evocative, immersive environments from visitors’ biometric data.

Nov. 1, 2 and 3 at 7:30 p.m. and Nov. 4 at 2 p.m. Mr. Burns, A Post-Electric Play
Dorothy Betts Marvin Theatre
800 21st St., NW
$10 to $20

The world as we know it is over. As group of survivors pass the time around a campfire, they piece together the plot of a “The Simpsons” episode entirely from memory. But as the apocalypse drags on, memory falters and live entertainment based on pop culture becomes mythology.

Nov. 3 and 4 Death Becomes Us: A True Crime Festival
Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
Prices vary

Mystery fans and would-be detectives can get a taste of blood at this two-day festival, which will feature live versions of fan favorite podcasts like Criminal and Wine & Crime and shows like Buzzfeed Unsolved.

Nov. 3 at 7:30 p.m. On the Threshold of Winter: An Opera
Flagg Building, North Atrium Gallery
500 17th St., NW
$10 to $20

This immersive, confessional and unsettling opera is based on the writings of Marin Sorescu, who in 1996 was nominated for a Nobel Prize, only to be diagnosed with liver cancer later that year. A literary hero in his native Romania, he continued to write poetry for the last five weeks of his life.

Opening Nov. 8 Howard Hodgkin in Venice
Flagg Building, Luther W. Brady Art Gallery
500 17th St., NW
Free

During his career, British painter Howard Hodgkin completed over 120 lithographs, etchings and screenprints. He gifted 10 prints to the Brady Art Gallery, including the breathtaking series “Venetian Views.” A companion exhibition, “Italy Inspiration: Images from the GW Community,” will feature photographs and prints from the GW collection and paintings by GW alumni.

Nov. 9 at 7:30 p.m. Yarn/Wire: The Winter Journey
Flagg Building, Atrium Gallery
500 17th St., NW
$10 to $20

Yarn/Wire, a quartet of two percussionists and two pianists, premiers this piece based on a short story by Georges Perec.

Nov. 9 at 9 p.m. Nancy Ajram and Hussam Al Rassam
Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
$55 to $75

Nancy Nabil Ajram is a Lebanese singer and recording artist, once described by Oprah Winfrey as “the Britney Spears of the Middle East.”

Opening Nov. 10 Rodarte
National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Ave., NW
$8 to $10

Fashion house Rodarte is known for its conceptual blend of high couture, modern femininity, craftsmanship and California cool. This exhibit offers a look at the first 13 years of the label’s work via pieces from pivotal collections, as well as accessories, runway videos and video shorts.

Nov. 10 at 10 a.m. Family Day: I Can See My House From Here!
The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free

Join “Eye of the Bird” artist Peter Waddell for a day of family-friendly activities designed to help you see Washington, D.C., from a bird’s perspective.

Nov. 15, 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. Fall Dance Concert 2018
Dorothy Betts Marvin Theatre
800 21st St., NW
$10 to $20

This year’s showcase for GW dancers and student choreographers features artistic director Maida Withers and guest artist Susan Rethorst.

Nov. 11 at 3 p.m. University Singers Concert
Flagg Building, North Atrium
500 17th St., NW

The University Singers’ choral tribute to World War I is titled “In Remembrance.”

Nov. 17 at 8 p.m. Mitski
9:30 Club
815 V St., NW
$25

Hailed as the new vanguard of indie rock after 2016’s “Puberty 2,” Mitski drew even more accolades with her sophomore album, “Be The Cowboy,” this summer. The singer-songwriter brings her incisive, pristine vocals to D.C. in November.

News

#GWtoDo: Your Curated Arts and Events Agenda

September 17, 2018

Jumpstart your job search at the Fall Career and Internship Fair, get an inside look at the Trump White House from legendary journalist Bob Woodward, take in opera in the outfield and