#GWtoDo: Your Curated Arts and Events Agenda

Catch “Hamilton” historian Ron Chernow, learn how journalists can connect better with the communities they serve, celebrate the closing of “OPEN” and more.

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February 25, 2019

March 27 at 6 p.m. Presidential Distinguished Event Series: Ron Chernow

Lisner Auditorium
730 21st St., NW
Free to students

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Ron Chernow, who will host the 2019 White House Correspondents’ Dinner on April 27, will discuss his life, his process and the journey from writing presidential biographies to inspiring Lin-Manuel Miranda’s blockbuster musical, “Hamilton.” Following the conversation, GW alumna and historian Lindsay Chervinsky will moderate a Q & A with students. This event is free to the GW community, but an RSVP is required.

 

 

 


Coming Up:

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March 26 at 1 p.m. Health Policy Leadership Lecture Series: Age-Friendly Health Systems

Marvin Center, Continental Ballroom
800 21st St., NW 
Free

Terry Fulmer, president of the John A. Hartford Foundation, will discuss the challenges and possibilities of age-friendly health systems in this talk, sponsored by the GW School of Nursing's Center for Health Policy and Media Engagement and Center for Aging, Health and Humanities. Dr. Fulmer was recently recognized among the "top 50 influencers in aging" by PBS’s Next Avenue.

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March 26 at 5:30 p.m. A Conversation with Athena Brown

Gelman Library, Room 702
2130 H St., NW
Free

Athena Brown, division chief of Indian and Native American programs in the U.S. Department of Labor, comes to campus for a special keynote lecture sponsored by the Indigenous America University Seminar in conjunction with the GW Office of the Provost University Seminar Program and the AT&T Center for Indigenous Politics and Policy.

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March 26 at 7 p.m. Spirituality and Social Justice

Sixth & I
600 I St., NW
$12 to $15

Are you doing enough to make the world a better place? Jewish writer and educator Erica Brown speaks with Ruth Messinger, an iconic activist and former president of the American Jewish World Service, and Sarah Hurwitz, former chief speechwriter for First Lady Michelle Obama, about the intersection between Judaism, spirituality and social justice. Co-sponsored by the Mayberg Center for Jewish Education and Leadership.

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March 27 at 5:30 p.m. Lecture: Norman Rockwell and American Freedom

The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum
701 21st St., NW
Free, registration required

Norman Rockwell possessed an almost uncanny ability to read the American psyche. In this talk, Virginia Mecklenburg, chief curator of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, will discuss Rockwell’s iconic Four Freedoms paintings’ evolution and impact.

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March 27 at 6 p.m. Should the News Take Sides?

Jack Morton Auditorium
805 21st St., NW
Free, registration requested

At a time when the president openly refers to the press as “the enemy of the people,” public trust in the media is falling and local news outlets struggle to stay alive. How can journalists heal democracy and better connect with the citizens and communities they serve? GW’s School of Media and Public Affairs, the White House Correspondents’ Association and Pew Research Center will bring together expert panelists in politics and journalism for a local and national perspective.

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March 28 at 5 p.m. Love Your Neighbor: Jews, Christians and the Meaning of a Very Elusive Commandment

Marvin Center, Room 301
800 21st St., NW
Free

The biblical mandate to “love your neighbor as yourself” is frequently held up in Jewish sources as “the great principle of the Torah.” Yet its meaning is elusive. Just what is the verse asking for? Theologian, scholar and educator Rabbi Shai Held will explore the traditions of thought surrounding this important verse.

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March 28 at 5:30 p.m. Leadership Lessons: Pathways to Progress Lecture Series featuring Carl Cohn

Marvin Center, Amphitheater
800 21st St., NW
Free, registration requested

When Carl Cohn began working at the Long Beach Unified School District in the 1990s, the community had experienced riots, loss of major industries and gang warfare on a horrific scale. But it came together to support urban schoolchildren in bold ways, and the improvement led to Dr. Cohn winning the McGraw Prize and the district winning the Broad Prize for Excellence in Urban Education. In this discussion, he will spell out the ways the Long Beach Unified project put the right kind of supports in place for at-risk students rather than focusing solely on standardized test scores.

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March 28 and 29 at 7:30 p.m., March 30 at 5 p.m. and March 31 at 2 p.m. ‘Women’s Works’

Marvin Center, Dorothy Betts Marvin Theatre
800 21st St., NW
$10 to $20

“Women’s Works” celebrates theatre’s ability to awaken our empathy and inspire us to make positive social change. Excerpts from “The Amateur: Reflections of Zelda,” “The Body Project,” the South Africa projects and more come together to illuminate the power of narrative. Plus, celebrate Professor Leslie Jacobson’s 42-plus years at GW and in the Washington, D.C., theater community at an Arts Club celebration March 30.

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March 28 at 8 p.m. Forbidden Planet Productions Presents ‘A New Brain’

West Hall, Blackbox
2100 Foxhall Rd., NW
$5

Brain surgery, sexual identity and songs about frogs stand center stage in “A New Brain,” a student production directed by Jordan Askey. 

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March 29 at 10 a.m. Big Ink

Flagg Building
500 17th St., NW
Free

At GW, protest is a tradition dating back decades. During this daylong demonstration, Big Ink studio will show off the presses on which it makes large-scale protest prints with a collection inspired by the Gelman Library’s Washingtoniana Collection and designed by faculty, students and alumni of the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design.

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March 31 at 6 p.m. “OPEN” closing night party

Flagg Building
500 17th St., NW
Free

Celebrate the run of Robin Bell’s lauded projection installation with food, drink, dance and even a “sonic symphony” by a 30-person guitar ensemble.

 


Save the Date:

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April 2 at 6 p.m. Shooting the Enemy

Flagg Building, Hammer Auditorium
500 17th St., NW
Free

In the early 1980s, before he was a working journalist, Harry Allen was a student at Adelphi University. There, he took photographs of future hip-hop legends Chuck D, Flavor Flav, Bomb Squad leader Hank Shocklee and more—several years before Public Enemy existed and long before their place in music history was assured. Mr. Allen will discuss growing up alongside some of the culture’s most iconic figures.

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April 5 at 9 p.m. International Students Spring Ball

Marvin Center Grand Ballroom
800 21st St., NW
$10

Enjoy a night of food, drinks, dancing and live performance with the International Services Office and International Students Association. Dress code is formal—with a touch of pink. 

Events